Types of Personal Boundaries Worksheet

Video & audio overview of the worksheet

What is the theory behind this Types of Personal Boundaries Worksheet?

Boundaries are limits that one sets for oneself to protect their well-being, integrity, and sense of self. It is a necessary precaution to always set healthy boundaries so that others know how to act around you and what to expect from you in various situations. It is a protective measure against being abused by others for their good.

According to the theory of personal space boundaries proposed by Scott in 1993, we all possess boundaries that we can adjust in terms of permeability, determining what we allow into and out of our physical, mental, and spiritual surroundings.

The most beneficial kind of boundary is one that is selectively open to certain individuals or situations at specific times, while closed off to others as needed. Effective communication of these boundaries in our daily interactions can either safeguard or put at risk our relationships.

There are several types of personal boundaries all of which require to be maintained at varying levels depending on the situation. These are, physical, intellectual and emotional in nature.

How will the worksheet help? 

This worksheet will provide information to clients about the types of personal boundaries that they need to maintain at healthy levels. This will help them set appropriate rules in all their relationships that can protect their own mental and physical well being. The worksheet will also prompt clients to reflect on how much they have neglected these boundaries and what they can do to start maintaining or building them. 

How to use the worksheet?

This worksheet will provide information to clients about the types of personal boundaries that they need to maintain at healthy levels. This will help them set appropriate rules in all their relationships that can protect their own mental and physical well-being. The worksheet will also prompt clients to reflect on how much they have neglected these boundaries, with whom they have neglected the boundaries, and what they can do to start maintaining or building them. 

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